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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
think the change in the commitment laws over the last 30 or 40 years has made it very difficult to compel someone to get treatment or be detained in a mental institution. these killers, is not as if there is a lack of funds for treatment. it is the lack of the ability of a parent would obviously have been a child, to go through the legal loopholes, is such that it is almost impossible. you end up with the tucson shooter who everyone spoke about. they had a sense he was psychotic. on guns, the problem is this. unless you are willing to completely disarm the population, as you do in canada or britain or australia did in the 1990's, and that it works and you have a decrease in gun crimes, if you allow grandfather of existing weapons, as would happen with the 1994 assault weapons law, at which time there were 25 million of the high- capacity magazines already in circulation, you do not accomplish anything. the studies of the 10-year experiment with the ban on assault weapons in the 1990's up to 2004 shows it had no effect. >> in april 1968, i was in ebenezer baptist church in atlant
. the source noted that the truman era law is so old it would take weeks to implement. even if the old law expires don't expect immediate spike if milk prices. >>> congress is still working to find agreement on the $60.4 billion emergency spending bill for hurricane sandy victims. some conservatives want the government to cut back spending in other areas in exchange for relief money. the new york and the new jersey governors ask for bigger aid packages. >>> the powerful winter storm swept through half of the country and left many in dark. arkansas, 15-inchs of snow caused widespread daniel to power lines and cutting electricity to 200,000 customers. chicago has already reached 500 homicides before the end of this year. the highest level in four years. windy city is desperate to lower its murder rate. correspondent mike tobin looks at one initiative to supporters hope will do just that. [ siren ] >> guy in the middle of the street. looks shot. >> gangland shooting part of every evening in chicago, the gun control debate is ongoing. solution passed by the cook county board of collisioners an
with the law, secretary clinton ordered this review to determine exactly what happened in benghazi. that is how we can learn and improve. i want to convey our appreciation to ambassador pickering, admiral mullen and 13. -- their team. in the hours and days after the terrorist attacks, at the secretary's direction, which took immediate steps to protect people and our post. we launched a worldwide review of the overall security posture. interagency teams give particular scrutiny to high threat posed. the pentagon agreed to dispatch additional marines to post around the world. we asked congress for funds to hire new diplomatic security personnel. we're updating our diplomat procedures to increase the number of experienced and well- trained staffs serving at those posts. tom and i will be discussing all this work and more with congress tomorrow. for now, let me make one other point. i have been a proud member of the foreign service for more than 30 years. i've had the honor of serving as a chief of mission overseas. i know that diplomacy by its very nature must sometimes be practiced in dangerous p
was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that, you ha
used in crimes that would be not law-abiding gun use. they would support amendments to carry guns on amtrak, national parks and bars and what i would call the notorious stand your ground legislation. do you think that agenda, if it has more exposure in this debate, i mean if the president read off those things in the state of the union, do you think that would drive a wedge between the average gun owner and the nra's national agenda? >> it would start a debate. look, it's not the job of reporters to carry one side of an argument. if the nra is making an argument and no one is making one against them, it has a consequence for the debate. what the gun control side has lacked for a long time is a powerful grassroots group that actually has the muscle and the money to force the conversation, to force leaders and lawmakers and presidents to talk about it. so you don't have a solution or problems -- >> i think we're abdicating responsibility there. we talk about, you know, far right and left and act like we're having a balanced debate. it's rare we go through statistics and teach the su
that is in effect. they do it, because if they don't do it, the farm legislation lapses and we revert to farm laws between 1938 and '39. the house has not even voted on its version. congress doing nothing about even the stuff everyone is paying attention to, not to mention being famously not in session, it seems highly unlikely the house is going to get it done in time. so what? here's what, in one example. if there is no new farm bill six days from now, the government will have to abide by the provisions of a 19 49d law regarding milk. that would require them to buy milk from dairy farmers at hugely inflated prices. if that law takes effect again in 2013, the government will be forced to pay double what it currently pays for milk. for a short time it will be awesome for dairy farmers, they can sell as much milk as they can to make a ton of money. even dairy farmers know that the windfall will be bad news real quick. the government run on milk will lead to shortages for people who buy milk at the grocery store or buy it to make dairy products like cheese and pizza. americans love their pizza. it w
>> and i have the right to petition the courts if the don't agree with a law. we are not going to all agree with every law that is passed. i don't agree with the laws that restrict contraception use now being put forth in different states around the country. i feel like those infringe on my rights as well. >> nothing infringes on your rights. >> you don't have to work at hobby lobby. economicception is an check issue for many women. >> this is about forcing the employer to give it to you for free. >> happy new. >> sean: and we continue to monitor here on the fox news channel america on the brink. the latest on the fiscal cliff. let not your heart be troubled. that is all the time we have left but greta is standing by >> juliet: wake up, everybody, it's saturday, december 29th. i'm juliet huddy. down to the wire for a fiscal cliff deal. and is it mitch mcconnell to the rescue. live in washington on the 11th hour negotiations. >> and did you know about to fall off the dairy cliff? >> juliet: have you seen the prices? >> dave: as high as 8 bucks a gallon for milk. >> clayton: oak
corruption scandals. russian president vladimir putin signed a bill into law today banning americans from adopting russian children. the move terminated more than 50 adoptions that already were underway. the measure came in reaction to a u.s. sanctions law targeting russians accused of human rights abuses. former president george h.w. bush was said to be alert and improving today. a family spokesman said he's even singing with doctors and nurses. mr. bush is 88 years old. he's been hospitalized in houston with complications from bronchitis. this week, he was placed in intensive care, but in an e-mail yesterday, his chief of staff said the former president wants people to put the harps back in the closet. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to margaret. >> warner: the victim of a horrific gang rape in india died tonight at a hospital in singapore. the attack enraged much of the country, and the reaction caught the government off-guard. ray suarez has more. >> suarez: the fury across india has been building for nearly two weeks, since a 23-year-old medical student was gang-
for granted, three great civil rights laws, medicare, just the vibrancy in those tapes, all you have to do is listen and he's back alive again swearing and being the most fascinating person that i've ever met in public life. and the books are helping because they create this giant character. he deserves it. >> and giant situations in front of him the way he came in as well as the way he left. >> a giant character and also -- >> dark clouds. >> you were there closely with him, but also so complicated. our relationships with our presidents are so personal, and the fact is he accomplished remarkable things politically. and yet you never get through a couple of pages of carol's books where you go, ew, this was not a good guy. >> i don't think -- that's not true. i disagree that he's not a good guy. he's a strange guy. >> they're all strange. >> there are not many presidents that take you into the bathroom and talk to you while they're in the bathroom. >> not enough. >> there's not many presidents that when he talks to you violates the normal human space between people so your head is right up
in places like california and hawaii because of land use laws from the 1960's. second, if you look to the community reinvestment act, if you think that is the cause of the bubble, you have to explain why there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over l
of paper. but ike took a nap. he had an idea. ike's farm was close by. he called his daughter in law and told her to have her kids all spruced up and on the porch of the farmhouse in 30 minutes. he brought khrushchev to meet them. ike's great insight about khrushchev was that he was a survivor. he survived stalin after robert the kremlin leaders were not early christian borders. they wanted to live. chris childs was charmed and warmed by ike's grandchildren. he had grandchildren, too. the next day after samore dickering he lifted his ultimatum on berlin. the crisis passed. of course, it was not the end of the cold war or the end of the crises. eisenhower was a great leader but he was not perfect. he made mistakes. one of them was trusting the cia too much. in may 1960 on the eve of a summit conference in paris, ike hopes was the beginning of the coup d'√Čtat, the soviet union. the cia spy plane was shot down over russia. the cia had suppressed a study showing the soviet antiaircraft missiles can now climb high enough to reach the u2, atlanta ike to believe the pilot would never be ca
was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice. i was going around to law firms. there were not that many women in the law firms. i had guys interview me. they would sit me down and say, do you understand you have to try cases? >> [laughter] >> i said that is what i wanted to do and was excited about it. i have clients in the beginning, i would go in to meet them. afterwards, one of my partners would say that they say that was not what i expected. he did not know there was going to be a lady lawyer on this case. but i really liked trying cases. it was a lot of fun. then i was drawn into politics. throughout my career, i have been interested in how to change things for the better. i have been very fortunate to have lots of opportunities to serve. >> you mentioned your mother. your mother died of lung cancer. she was such a force in your life. >> i think it made me very strong because it was very clear i had no one to depend on but me. >> 3 the o
you are a republican from georgia or a liberal democrat from manhattan, as soon as a law like that gets passed, people become creative in finding ways to qualify. out of the woodwork, all the folks that would qualify. at the end of the david acton & social security age for everybody was truly disabled and let the market take care of its. people in stress occupations for many years now have been leaving those stress occupations well old age of 65 to go into some other line of work. a good example is people that install floors. it's tough in your knees. you see very few people doing that passed the age of 40. they find other work in the construction sector. baseball players have saw money, they don't have to work when they are done. host: let's hear from paul, a republican, in indiana. caller: how are you? there's a competing network of button tot has a access "rise above." if i had a button, it would say stop wasteful spending. how much money we would save if we stop wasteful spending. guest: we could also find our sunny and obscure and ridiculous government spending programs.
for an american law that targets russian human rights violators. over the past two decades american families have adopted some 60,000 russian kids. the united nations children's fund estimates there are 740,000 orphans in the country with only a few thousand russians trying to adopt them. we will see an immediate impact. a russian official says 46 children whom americans are right in the process is of adopting right now you would not be able to leave the country. >> usually typically depending on the region a 10 day waiting period and those 46 parent ares, couples are in the ten day wait so it is devastating that they already met their child and started the bonding process. i can't even fathom what they are going through. >> heart break. and teleenviesed comments the president said countries should take care of their own and added with some sarcasm there are probably many places in the world where living standards are so higher than ours. so what, are we going to send our children there? maybe we should move there ourselves. children's rights advocates say it will have a strong effect with orphan
shootings, a familiar american policy-making consensus called for federal gun-control laws. more precisely, they want congress to pass the ban on big, dramatic-looking assault-type weapons that existed from 1994 until the law sun-setted in 2004. government, for the past 80 years, or so, has seen its purpose as mainly to respond to society's failures the moment they occur or whenever they are imagined. adam lanza killed with guns so modern, policy-making logic posits that government must pass a law. whether that law will accomplish its goal is irrelevant. policy-making has become an activity that supports the genetic and financial needs of policymakers and their follower tribes. the community's role, we've lately learned, is to provide revenue. where are we going with that? >> i think he started off in a legitimate direction where he talked about how much of the legislation is done with deadlines and during lame-duck sessions. we're responsive as opposed to getting proactive. i get where he's coming from with respect to failures with the assault weapons ban in 1994. if you had a ban prior t
are at the point where in four days every american's tax rates are scheduled to go up by law. every americans' paychecks will get considerably smaller. that would be the wrong thing to do for our economy, it would be bad for middle-class families, and it would be bad for businesses that depend on family spending. congress can prevent it if they act right now. i just had a good and constructive discussion here at the white house with leadership about how to prevent the tax hike on the middle class. i am optimistic we may reach an agreement that can pass both houses in time. senators reid and mcconnell are working on such an agreement as we speak, but if an agreement is not reached in time between senator reid and senator mcconnell, then i will urge senator reid to bring to the floor a basic package for an up or down vote to protect the middle class from an income tax hike, extends the vital lifeline of unemployment insurance to 2 million americans looking for a job, and lays the groundwork for future cooperation on more economic growth and deficit reduction. i believe such a proposal could pas
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)